Eriovixia laglaizei
[Laglaise's Garden Spider]
If you are interested to use any of the image(s), please read the conditions carefully.
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DSC02853 (13)
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DSC07844 (11)
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DSC02867 (14)
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DSC09885 (11)
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DSC08609 (12)
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DSC08597 (12)
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DSC08074 (11)
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Classification: | Phylum: Arthropoda | Class: Arachnida | Order: Araneae | Family: Araneidae | Genus: Eriovixia |

According to Wikipedia, there are 24 species of Eriovixia throughout Africa and Asia as of April 2019. In the distribution mentioned, the closest countries to Singapore are Philippines and Indonesia. Malaysia was not mentioned as well.

Some folks had used the name Eriovixia laglaisei with a "s" in "laglaisei" instead of a "z". I saw a comment that "s" in the name Laglaise is the person who actually collected the specimens, but it is pronounced as "z" in French which maybe the reason it was changed to comply with the Latin pronunciation rules.

In the Singapore spider checklist published in 2002, the name is spelled with a ā€œzā€. Distribution of the spider was indicated as Singapore and Philippines. It was the only spider from the genus Eriovixia in this checklist. The name with a "s" was used in the booklet "A Guide to Common Singapore Spiders" (first published in 1989) by Joseph Koh. Distribution of this spider was indicated in Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, Sri Lanka and India. In the World Spider Catalog website, the name with the "z" was listed.

In the Singapore's 5th National Report to the Convention on Biological Diversity (2010-2014) published by National Parks Board in 2015, the species Eriovixia pseudocentrodes was added. More recently in 2019, a third Eriovixia spider (Eriovixia excelsa) was added to the Singapore list. The fourth one would be Eriovixia porcula which is found in Singapore according to the World Spider Catalog website. Pictures of this spider taken in Singapore is available in the Internet. In the photos above, the spider with a pointed long tail end (bottom right last picture) may indeed be an Eriovixia porcula.